664 posts categorized " Lithe Method "

LITHE ESCAPE S/S 2016 3 Feb 2016

Lithe Escape Escape

We're heading back to Jake's! From May 12-17 2016, we're going to Lauren's happy place, Jake's Treasure Beach! Jake's is earthy, friendly, rugged, red, rustic, local, sustainable and hip; it's the epitome of bohemian luxury.

The backstory: A good friend introduced Lauren to Treasure Beach back in 2008, and she fell in love with the area, the welcoming community, and the friends that she made there. Treasure Beach and Jamaica's south coast are the antithesis of a tourist trap. It's off the beaten path, but it hasn't stopped her from returning again and again.

Treasure Beach is a tiny fishing village and the community there is truly unlike any other in Jamaica. Defined by the Santa Cruz Mountains and the rolling farmland of the Pedro Plains, Treasure Beach is known for its cacti, endless natural coastlines, and miles of sweeping savannas—not its white sand beaches or jungle-like rainforests. Treasure Beach is renowned for its warm people, deep community spirit, and rich history (which even includes a Scottish shipwreck from the 19th century). 

Full Disclosure: This is the real Jamaica. It's an almost three-hour drive from the airport, so get ready for an adventure that you'll never forget and to fall in love with a place where you'll most certainly leave your heart. 

What is Lithe Escape? Imagine one week to focus on yourself ... a better body, more confidence, lessons learned, fabulous food and fitness, inches and pounds lost (without going hungry), unparalleled results, and an entire support system of like-minded people. Get excited for girl time and downtime, a healthier body and mind, unbelievably delicious food, and a week that's all about YOU

Want to learn more? Download Jake's Escape 2015 (this is last year's brochure...prices are the same but please note that the dates are different for this year).

REBEL 13 Jan 2016

Rebel

 

Trans-firm your entire body. Rebel is a revolutionary total body, high cardio Lithe rebounder + bands workout. While Rebel is built upon our classic CCS technique and Lithe Method-ology, it serves up a veritable 'buff'-et of high and low bouncing CCS that gets your heart rate up and encourages dramatic lymphatic drainage (bye bye cellulite). Take it to the max while you clap, twist, turn, and jump on and off the rebounder. Then increase your burn with standing and grounded sculpting mat-work that tones your not-so-hard 'core' areas. It's modifiable and classically Lithe.


• Born: December 2015
• You need: Twiggy bands, wristbands, and a rebounder
• Coordination level: 3 (on a scale of 1-3)

LITHE IN TRAVEL & LEISURE 6 Jan 2016

Travel & Leisure T&L1
T&L2

Read 7 Ways to Kick Off Your Detox in Philly

7 BASIC PRINCIPLES: FOOT PLACEMENT 5 Jan 2016

Foot Placement

Lithe Method’s seven anatomically sound basic principles form the foundation of our Cardio-­Cheer-Sculpting technique. Because they assist the body in moving through our exercises safely and effectively, each one should be referenced and reinforced. 

Certain principles are uniquely tailored to Lithe such as our Lithe breath, pelvic alignment, and proper hand placement with our Higher Power band system. Some overlap anatomical principles in other movement disciplines. At Lithe, we teach these principles in our own unique style, but the anatomy behind them is universal.  

We've talked about breathing, cervical spine alignmentshoulder stabilization, ribcage alignment, pelvic placement and hand placement. This week we dive into foot placement. 

In Lithe, we believe in barefoot training. Working through the whole foot strengthens the foot and ankle and protects you from overuse injuries. Foot placement refers to the action of sponging into the mat during cardio movement, as well as the awareness of proper foot placement for each exercise. 

When your instructor explains foot placement, he/she will cue you to roll through the foot, toe-­ball-­heel, on all launches and landings, absorbing impact evenly and safely. Our Lithe workout can be cardio-­heavy (we believe that impact has impact, and builds bone density), but we aim to ground our cardio by sponging down into the mat through the entire foot, in contrast to being light and bouncy up on our toes.

When working in stiletto, it's important to find the center of your foot/ankle and avoid pronation or supination of the ankle. The center of the foot is located on the ball of the foot, under the second toe.

At Lithe we believe in strengthening the body by working in both parallel and lateral positions. Foot placement is important so that you have a strong base for all exercises. If your form is off, it is often a result of improper foot placement. Sometimes simply adjusting your foot placement will solve a form issue, particularly when working at the barre or with the bands.

Because we teach you to sponge into the floor and because we offer many modifications, most people are able to sustain a barefoot Lithe practice. However, some Lithers find that it is more comfortable to wear sneakers. This is always permitted, but we require that you wear a fitness sneaker that is only worn indoors. Street shoes are not allowed in Lithe studios.

Lithe instructor Meg Grauzlis in FP Movement via Dom

7 BASIC PRINCIPLES: HAND PLACEMENT 23 Dec 2015

Hands

Lithe Method’s seven anatomically sound basic principles form the foundation of our Cardio-­Cheer-Sculpting technique. Because they assist the body in moving through our exercises safely and effectively, each one should be referenced and reinforced. 

Certain principles are uniquely tailored to Lithe such as our Lithe breath, pelvic alignment, and proper hand placement with our Higher Power band system. Some overlap anatomical principles in other movement disciplines. At Lithe, we teach these principles in our own unique style, but the anatomy behind them is universal.  

We've talked about breathing, cervical spine alignmentshoulder stabilization, ribcage alignment, and pelvic placement. This week we dive into hand placement. 

Hand placement refers to the proper alignment of hands on the mat and with Lithe’s Higher Power band system. When working on the mat, it's important to be mindful of hand placement during movements such as pushups and seesaws or anytime we work in a tabletop position. Ideally, the wrist crease is parallel to the front of the mat and your fingertips are spread wide. You'll hear your instructor cue to press into the fingertips and the base of the fingers, while suctioning the palm off of the mat. The goal is to spread the weight into the entire hand, while minimizing the pressure on the wrist.

Our Higher Power band system brings the perfect resistance load to the core, back, and arms. Working with too much resistance from above can cause muscular and spinal strain. Correct hand placement maximizes the impact of the band system and allows it to define the armpit, work the shoulder girdle, and isometrically work the rhomboids and trapezius.

The hand should be loose with the blue band in between the thumb and index finger. The palm faces down with the fingertips long and in line with the wrist. The fingers may close lightly over the band as you work to build strength, but the bands should never be held in a “claw” position and the wrists should never be broken. Incorrect hand placement causes excessive tension in the forearm, wrist, and hand and results in an imbalance in the muscles of the forearm.

Gloves are required for all classes using the blue bands. Your hands, forearms, and muscles surrounding the elbow joint (above and below the elbow) may hurt initially, but you'll gain strength with practice. It is better to drop the bands and take a quick break rather than fight through the movements with improper form.

Image via Antrim & Spruce Photography

7 BASIC PRINCIPLES: PELVIC PLACEMENT 15 Dec 2015

Pelvic Placement

Lithe Method’s seven anatomically sound basic principles form the foundation of our Cardio-­Cheer-Sculpting technique. Because they assist the body in moving through our exercises safely and effectively, each one should be referenced and reinforced. 

Certain principles are uniquely tailored to Lithe such as our Lithe breath, pelvic alignment, and proper hand placement with our Higher Power band system. Some overlap anatomical principles in other movement disciplines. At Lithe, we teach these principles in our own unique style, but the anatomy behind them is universal.  

We've talked about breathing, cervical spine alignment, shoulder stabilization, and ribcage alignment. This week we dive into pelvic placement. 

At Lithe, we reference three placements of the pelvis: neutral, imprint, and tuck. Understanding pelvic placement is essential for Lithing correctly, and pelvic placement is referenced and reinforced throughout our workouts. The three pelvic placements described here don't look identical on every body.

Neutral
Neutral refers to the natural position of the pelvis and spine. When the pelvis is in neutral, the pubis symphysis (pubic bone) and ASIS (hip bones) are on a level plane. The spine maintains its natural curvature. The spine is in its strongest position when its three curves are naturally aligned. We often work in neutral in order to strengthen and prepare the body for our natural, everyday movement. In neutral, the abdominal muscles and other muscles around the pelvis can be engaged. However the pelvis remains in its natural position.

You may hear instructors use the image of a martini glass balancing perfectly on the pelvis when in a supine position on the mat. Some exercises will always be performed in neutral. In others, neutral will be offered as a more challenging variation. For example, certain ab exercises that are typically performed in imprint can be safely performed in neutral by a client with superior abdominal strength.

Imprint
Imprint is an abdominal contraction resulting in a very slight posterior tilt of the pelvis. This tilt should only be 5-­10 degrees. The pelvic tilt should always be a result of abdominal engagement paired with breath. Imprint stabilizes the pelvis and protects the back during ab work and other exercises. When you think of the martini glass while moving from neutral to imprint, you tip the glass just enough that the contents of the glass spill towards your chest.

When in imprint, the tilt of the pelvis causes a slight lessening of the lumbar curve, however the back should not flatten into the mat. Imprint does not look identical on every body and will vary depending on individual spine curvature.

Tuck
In tuck, we take imprint a step further by engaging not only the abs, but also the large muscle groups of quads, glutes, and hamstrings (the fat burners!).

We only tuck in a few positions throughout our workouts. A few examples include during modified bridge/butt work, the standing wide second position, standing tall in liberty at the barre, and standing up in a lunge. The tucked position works our fat burners and stabilizes the pelvis, but it is not healthy for the body to constantly work in tuck. Most Lithers often try to work in an over-­tucked position. In an over-­tuck, the pelvis is unnaturally pressed forward, the lumbar curve is completely flattened, and the hip flexors shorten and tense. This may be a result of their experience with barre-­based workouts that promote a more exaggerated tuck or they may just be exaggerating the movement with the goal of increasing their burn.

Lithers also have a tendency to allow the chest and shoulders to collapse forward towards the pelvis during a tuck. This almost always happens when clients are over­tucking as a result of their spinal flexion, but may occur during a proper tuck as well.

Lithe instructor Meg G. in FP Movement in tuck via Dom

MASTER INSTRUCTOR: ELIZABETH TOMKINS 10 Dec 2015

ETomk

We're excited to announce that Lithe instructor Elizabeth Tomkins is now a master Lithe instructor! Elizabeth has taught since 2010 and joins master instructors Tiffany Nork (teaching since 2006), Krista DeNofa (teaching since 2008), Bari Rosenthal (teaching since 2009), and Liz Galbally (teaching since 2010). 

 

What makes an instructor a master? They must teach Lithe for at least four years and have taught a minimum of 1,000 classes. The status is something that is earned, not simply given. The Lithe master instructor embodies a commitment to Lithe, instructs with confidence and selflessness, and continues to study the method. Other elements that define this title include maturity and understanding of instructor injury prevention, utilization of voice (instead of body) for energy, total command of a large studio of 25-30 people, and involvement in instructor training. 

 

We all know that Lithe is different and teaching it is the ultimate multi-task. Many assume that teaching Lithe is like teaching a grounded workout that rarely changes such as yoga, spinning, barre, or Pilates. They couldn't be more wrong. Lithe instructors are triple threats and it takes years to become a well-oiled teaching machine. Our instructors are forever in training and constantly learning new workouts.   

Image of Elizabeth wearing Lululemon via Dom

7 BASIC PRINCIPLES: RIBCAGE ALIGNMENT 8 Dec 2015

Ribcage Alignment

Lithe Method’s seven anatomically sound basic principles form the foundation of our Cardio-­Cheer-Sculpting technique. Because they assist the body in moving through our exercises safely and effectively, each one should be referenced and reinforced. 

Certain principles are uniquely tailored to Lithe such as our Lithe breath, pelvic alignment, and proper hand placement with our Higher Power Band System. While some overlap anatomical principles found in other movement disciplines. At Lithe, we teach these principles in our own unique style, but the anatomy behind them is universal.  

We've talked about breathing,  cervical spine alignment, and shoulder stabilization. This week we dive into ribcage alignment. 

Proper ribcage alignment ensures that the entire torso remains safely aligned, from the shoulders to the knees, and that the abdominal muscles remain engaged throughout the workout. Ribcage alignment refers to both the alignment of the ribcage over the pelvis, and the knitting together of the ribs on the front of the torso.

Ribcage alignment plays an important role in engaging the core, because the abdominal muscles are attached at the lower ribs. When working on the mat or standing, keep the ribcage knitted together, not allowing the ribs to splay open and forward. In this way, the abdominal muscles can stay engaged. Also, try to keep the ribcage aligned over the pelvis during standing work such as lunges, and while on the mat during movements such as modified bridge. Ribcage alignment functions in line with the Lithe breath in order to stabilize and engage our core muscles.

Image of Lithe Instructor Elizabeth Tomkins

7 BASIC PRINCIPLES: SHOULDER STABILIZATION 2 Dec 2015

Shoulders

Lithe Method’s seven anatomically sound Basic Principles form the foundation of our Cardio-­Cheer-Sculpting technique. Because they assist the body in moving through our exercises safely and effectively, each one should be referenced and reinforced. 

Certain principles are uniquely tailored to Lithe such as our Lithe breath, pelvic alignment, and proper hand placement with our Higher Power Band System. While some overlap anatomical principles found in other movement disciplines. At Lithe, we teach these principles in our own unique style, but the anatomy behind them is universal.  

We've talked about breathing and cervical spine alignment. This week we dive into shoulder stabilization, which is also known as scapular stabilization. It's the ability to properly engage the scapular muscles in order to stabilize the shoulder girdle and bring the work out of the upper arms and neck and into the torso and core.

The scapula have no bony attachments and are very mobile, moving up (elevating), down, inward, outward, and in rotation. To stabilize the shoulder girdle, slide the scapula down the back, imagining the back muscles forming the shape of a V. The scapula should lie flat on the back. In addition to stabilizing the shoulder girdle, sliding the shoulders down strengthens the abs, lower back, hip, and lateral trunk muscles while decompressing and stretching the spine. It is important to stabilize the scapula and shoulders at the initiation of every exercise. When you don't, the upper trapezius and other muscles around the neck and upper shoulders have a tendency to be overworked.

Properly moving the shoulder muscles is the most effective way to engage the trunk muscles of the back and core. This engagement is never about forcing the shoulders down, but rather sliding them gently while lengthening the trunk muscles in opposition. Shoulder stabilization is easy to feel during band work, as you're able to notice the resistance of your shoulders sliding down in opposition to the bands. You'll hear instructors telling you to slide your shoulders down, and they may even tap you to remind you to release these muscles.

Image of Lithe instructor Jaime Powers

LITHE STUDIO STAFF (MAIN LINE & CENTER CITY)! 28 Nov 2015

Hiring
We're looking for a few great people to round out our front of the house team!

Part-time front desk studio staff roles and responsibilities:

  • Provide high level hospitality and customer service to clients
  • Comfortable with computer database functions and have basic computer skills
  • Have experience handling money and a register
  • Communicate clearly and efficiently via e-mail and telephone
  • Maintain the Lithe Method brand aesthetic and studio appearance
  • Maintain the appearance and upkeep of Lithe’s retail (Lithe Foods and Lithe Wear)
  • Assist Lithe’s Studio Manager in daily studio tasks and projects

What's required?

  • Ability to prioritize and multi-task independently within a fast-paced environment
  • Willingness to initiate tasks independently
  • Excellent communication skills and superior organizational skills
  • Outstanding customer service skills and confidentiality
  • Friendly and professional email and phone etiquette
  • Have a passion for Lithe, healthy living and fitness
  • Be willing to participate in Lithe Method workouts to fully understand the brand
  • Flexible/non-traditional hours:  multiple days per week, including some holidays, early mornings, nights, and weekends

Part-time front desk studio positions are currently open with the following anticipated hours:

  • Lithe Main Line & Center City  15-20 hours per week (including some early mornings, nights, and weekends)

Please submit resume, cover letter, and availability to careers@lithemethod.com.

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